“What a day,” Quarterback Kellen Mond exhaled on his way out of the press room around 5:30 P.M. CST after walking away from the video call. Indeed, what a day for each player that participated in the Senior Bowl. Many players either significantly harmed or improved their draft stock today. During the game, it became clear that some players did better than others. Looking back, many looked in the game like how they did earlier in the week during practice.

Those that attended practice and the game also noticed a few tidbits that were not presented during the television broadcast of the game. Here are several of those Senior Bowl facts in addition to other tidbits that cannot be found in today’s broadcast.

Senior Bowl Facts Not Presented In Broadcast

Tre’ McKitty Practices How He Plays

Although tight end Tre’ McKitty wasn’t able to exactly take over the game, he was able to snag a nice reception for 14 yards. However, this was not the only McKitty highlight of the week as he had one of the best catches of the week during practice, catching the ball one-handed with one arm extended straight in front of him as he rocketed toward the sideline.

Jamie Newman Practices How He Plays

On Thursday, quarterback Jamie Newman dropped a snap. When prospects make a mistake at the most basic level of quarterbacking, it usually is not a one-time issue. Newman dropped a snap during practice and he dropped one during the game as well. Luckily, complete disaster was avoided both times but NFL general managers do not want to see a pattern of problems holding the football from the player who touches the ball every play.

Senior Bowl Facts: Quiet, Focused Sidelines

While the broadcast definitively showed the sidelines at times during the game, it did not show that both sidelines were largely quiet and looking toward the field for the duration of the game except for a few game-changing plays.

Senior Bowl Facts: New York!

During practice, there were a lot of players yelling “New York” as an audible. During the game, the words were also audible to those watching live. However, the transition was much smoother during the game than it was during practice. In practice early in the week, many players were looking around for direction when those words were yelled but during the game, the transition was much snappier.

Michael Carter Practices How He Plays

Running back Michael Carter, out of North Carolina, looked explosive in practice during the week. On Saturday, the young running back ran for 60 yards on 8 carries and a touchdown. He also caught two balls for 15 yards. Put simply, Carter tore up practice and he did the same during the game.

Senior Bowl Facts: The Crowd Had a Good Chunk of Mobile Locals

The largest roar of the first half was when the public announcer declared that South Alabama linebacker Riley Cole made a play. Compared to the Cole play, the crowd was noticeably quieter during the rest of the game with the possible exception of touchdowns and turnovers. Almost as if to consciously make an effort to confirm this, they had another big uproar later in the game after Cole made another play.

Senior Bowl Facts: Attack Of Mac

“We Want Mac! We Want Mac!” reverberated the crowd at the start of the fourth quarter. It was unclear if they were unaware of his injury suffered in the last practice of the week or if they simply wanted to see him anyway. Although Quarterback Mac Jones suited up for the game, he did not play and the crowd was instead treated to more of Jamie Newman and Kellen Mond.

Ian Van Roy

Author Ian Van Roy

Ian is a hardcore Denver Broncos fan. He spends his Sundays watching the games and follows the team closely. If Pro Football is on, he is watching it.

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