Top 5 Los Angeles Rams Rookie Seasons Of All-Time

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The Los Angeles Rams have a rich history of drafting impactful rookies. From the moment they took LA by storm moving from Cleveland, to their recent Super Bowl run, talented young players have contributed to the team’s success.

But which rookies have truly stood out as the best? LAFB dove into the archives to explore the Top 5 Los Angeles Rams rookie seasons of all time. These young stars not only impressed early in their careers, but their performances left a lasting impact on the franchise.

*Player selections were limited to those who were picked and played in LA.

Los Angeles Rams Rookie Seasons Of All-Time

Puka Nacua, WR – 2023

In 2023, rookie wide receiver Puka Nacua defied expectations with a record-breaking season for the Los Angeles Rams. Drafted 177th overall, Nacua quickly established himself as a reliable target for quarterback Matthew Stafford. He set both the NFL rookie record for receptions with 105, hauling in 1,486 yards and scoring 6 touchdowns. His blend of route-running savvy, strong hands, and big-play ability made him a key contributor to the Rams’ offensive attack, silencing any doubts about his selection.

Eric Dickerson, RB – 1983

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Peter Brouillet-USA TODAY SportsCredit: Peter Brouillet-USA TODAY Sports

Eric Dickerson exploded onto the scene in 1983, redefining what a rookie running back could accomplish. Selected second overall by the Los Angeles Rams, Dickerson shattered NFL rookie records with a staggering 1,808 rushing yards, a mark that still stands today. His dominance wasn’t limited to yardage; he also bulldozed his way to 18 rushing touchdowns, showcasing both power and elusiveness. Dickerson’s immediate impact propelled him to Offensive Rookie of the Year and All-Pro honors, setting the stage for a legendary career and forever etching his name in NFL history.

Deacon Jones, DL – 1961

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Darryl Norenberg-USA TODAY SportsCredit: Darryl Norenberg-USA TODAY Sports

Drafted in the 14th round out of Mississippi Valley State, Jones recorded 9.5 sacks in his 14 games played. This number has stood for over 60 years as the Rams’ rookie sack record. His raw talent and relentless pursuit of the quarterback were undeniable.

Deacon Jones would go on to revolutionize the defensive end position, earning the nickname “The Secretary of Defense” for his pass-rushing style and becoming a crucial part of the Rams’ famed “Fearsome Foursome” defensive line.

Isiah Robertson, LB – 1971

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Malcolm Emmons-USA TODAY SportsCredit: Malcolm Emmons-USA TODAY Sports

Drafted 10th overall, Isiah Robertson faced initial criticism for a lackluster start. However, he quickly turned things around, earning a starting role at strongside linebacker and silencing his doubters. His speed and defensive instincts were on display throughout the season, as he racked up four interceptions, and 15 fumble recoveries, and led the team in tackles. His impressive rookie campaign earned him the AP Defensive Rookie of the Year award and solidified him as a key piece of the Rams’ defense for years to come.

Jerome Bettis, RB – 1993

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Peter Brouillet-USA TODAY SportsCredit: Peter Brouillet-USA TODAY Sports

In 1993, Jerome Bettis, nicknamed “The Bus” for his powerful running style, rumbled onto the scene for the Los Angeles Rams. Drafted 10th overall, Bettis didn’t disappoint. He immediately established himself as a workhorse back, leading the league in rushing attempts (294) and finishing second in rushing yards (1,429) – a remarkable feat for a rookie.

His ability to break tackles and churn out tough yards injected a new dimension into the Rams’ offense. Bettis’ rookie season wasn’t just about raw numbers; he displayed maturity and leadership beyond his years. His relentless drive and punishing carries earned him the prestigious Offensive Rookie of the Year award, a fitting start to a Hall of Fame career that would see him become a fan favorite in both Los Angeles and Pittsburgh.